Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes.

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  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Technology Sydney, Australia
      Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Australia
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Purpose: In a companion paper, we found no statistical reason to favor percentage syllables stuttered (%SS) over parent-reported stuttering severity as a primary outcome measure for clinical trials of early stuttering. Hence, considering the logistical advantages of the latter measure, we recommended parent-reported stuttering severity for use as an outcome measure. The present report extends the prior analysis to a comparison of %SS with self-reported stuttering severity (SRSS) for use as an outcome measure in clinical trials of stuttering treatments for adults. Method: We analyzed data from four randomized clinical trials for adults that incorporated %SS and SRSS data at prerandomization and at 6 months post randomization. We analyzed the distributions associated with the two measures, their agreement, and their estimates of effect sizes. Results: The positively skewed distribution of %SS warrants much reservation about its value as a clinical trial outcome measure. This skew causes inherent instability because of spurious data associated with low scores, which occur commonly at the low end of such a distribution. This inherent instability is compounded by inherent problems with absolute reliability of %SS measures. These problems are reduced with the much more normal distribution of SRSS. Conclusions: The logistical arguments in favor of SRSS apply similarly to adults as they do when parents report the stuttering severity of their children. However, there are statistical reasons to favor SRSS over %SS measures as a primary outcome of clinical trials with adult participants: SRSS has acceptable discriminant validity and a normal distribution, and it is less error prone than %SS. We recommend SRSS as a primary outcome for clinical trials of adults with stuttering.
    • Journal Subset:
      Allied Health; Peer Reviewed; USA
    • ISSN:
      1092-4388
    • MEDLINE Info:
      NLM UID: 9705610
    • Grant Information:
      This research was supported by Program Grants 1132370, 402763, and 633007 from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia
    • Publication Date:
      20200710
    • Publication Date:
      20200710
    • DOI:
      10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00142
    • Accession Number:
      143772182
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      O’BRIAN, S. et al. Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes. Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research, [s. l.], v. 63, n. 5, p. 1387–1394, 2020. DOI 10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00142. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=143772182. Acesso em: 29 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      O’Brian S, Heard R, Onslow M, Packman A, Lowe R, Menzies RG. Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes. Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research. 2020;63(5):1387-1394. doi:10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00142
    • APA:
      O’Brian, S., Heard, R., Onslow, M., Packman, A., Lowe, R., & Menzies, R. G. (2020). Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes. Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research, 63(5), 1387–1394. https://doi.org/10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00142
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      O’Brian, Sue, Rob Heard, Mark Onslow, Ann Packman, Robyn Lowe, and Ross G. Menzies. 2020. “Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes.” Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research 63 (5): 1387–94. doi:10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00142.
    • Harvard:
      O’Brian, S. et al. (2020) ‘Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes’, Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research, 63(5), pp. 1387–1394. doi: 10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00142.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      O’Brian, S, Heard, R, Onslow, M, Packman, A, Lowe, R & Menzies, RG 2020, ‘Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes’, Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research, vol. 63, no. 5, pp. 1387–1394, viewed 29 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      O’Brian, Sue, et al. “Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes.” Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research, vol. 63, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 1387–1394. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00142.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      O’Brian, Sue, Rob Heard, Mark Onslow, Ann Packman, Robyn Lowe, and Ross G. Menzies. “Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes.” Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research 63, no. 5 (May 2020): 1387–94. doi:10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00142.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      O’Brian S, Heard R, Onslow M, Packman A, Lowe R, Menzies RG. Clinical Trials of Adult Stuttering Treatment: Comparison of Percentage Syllables Stuttered With Self-Reported Stuttering Severity as Primary Outcomes. Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research [Internet]. 2020 May [cited 2020 Oct 29];63(5):1387–94. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=143772182