Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests.

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  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin--Madison
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Purpose: Motion sickness (MS) is a common condition that affects millions of individuals. Although the condition is common and can be debilitating, little research has focused on the vestibular function associated with susceptibility to MS. One causal theory of MS is an asymmetry of vestibular function within or between ears. The purposes of this study, therefore, were (a) to determine if the vestibular system (oculomotor and caloric tests) in videonystagmography (VNG) is associated with susceptibility to MS and (b) to determine if these tests support the theory of an asymmetry between ears associated with MS susceptibility. Method: VNG was used to measure oculomotor and caloric responses. Fifty young adults were recruited; 50 completed the oculomotor tests, and 31 completed the four caloric irrigations. MS susceptibility was evaluated with the Motion Sickness Susceptibility Questionnaire--Short Form; in this study, percent susceptibility ranged from 0% to 100% in the participants. Participants were divided into three susceptibility groups (Low, Mid, and High). Repeatedmeasures analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons determined significance among the groups on the VNG test results. Results: Oculomotor test results revealed no significant differences among the MS susceptibility groups. Caloric stimuli elicited responses that were correlated positively with susceptibility to MS. Slow-phase velocity was slowest in the Low MS group compared to the Mid and High groups. There was no significant asymmetry between ears in any of the groups. Conclusions: MS susceptibility was significantly and positively correlated with caloric slow-phase velocity. Although asymmetries between ears are purported to be associated with MS, asymmetries were not evident. Susceptibility to MS may contribute to interindividual variability of caloric responses within the normal range.
    • Journal Subset:
      Allied Health; Peer Reviewed; USA
    • Instrumentation:
      Motion Sickness Susceptibility Questionnaire¿Short Form (MSSQ-S)
    • ISSN:
      1059-0889
    • MEDLINE Info:
      NLM UID: 9114917
    • Grant Information:
      The project described was supported by the Clinical and Translational Science Award Program, through National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Grant UL1TR000427. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Parts of this study were presented at the 2016 ASHA Convention in Philadelphia.
    • Publication Date:
      20200611
    • Publication Date:
      20200617
    • DOI:
      10.1044/2020_AJA-19-00050
    • Accession Number:
      143637995
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      FOWLER, C. G.; DALLAPIAZZA, M.; TALBOT HADSELL, K. Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests. American Journal of Audiology, [s. l.], v. 29, n. 2, p. 188–198, 2020. DOI 10.1044/2020_AJA-19-00050. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=143637995. Acesso em: 26 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Fowler CG, Dallapiazza M, Talbot Hadsell K. Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests. American Journal of Audiology. 2020;29(2):188-198. doi:10.1044/2020_AJA-19-00050
    • APA:
      Fowler, C. G., Dallapiazza, M., & Talbot Hadsell, K. (2020). Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests. American Journal of Audiology, 29(2), 188–198. https://doi.org/10.1044/2020_AJA-19-00050
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Fowler, Cynthia G., Margaret Dallapiazza, and Kathleen Talbot Hadsell. 2020. “Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests.” American Journal of Audiology 29 (2): 188–98. doi:10.1044/2020_AJA-19-00050.
    • Harvard:
      Fowler, C. G., Dallapiazza, M. and Talbot Hadsell, K. (2020) ‘Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests’, American Journal of Audiology, 29(2), pp. 188–198. doi: 10.1044/2020_AJA-19-00050.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Fowler, CG, Dallapiazza, M & Talbot Hadsell, K 2020, ‘Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests’, American Journal of Audiology, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 188–198, viewed 26 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Fowler, Cynthia G., et al. “Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests.” American Journal of Audiology, vol. 29, no. 2, June 2020, pp. 188–198. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1044/2020_AJA-19-00050.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Fowler, Cynthia G., Margaret Dallapiazza, and Kathleen Talbot Hadsell. “Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests.” American Journal of Audiology 29, no. 2 (June 2020): 188–98. doi:10.1044/2020_AJA-19-00050.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Fowler CG, Dallapiazza M, Talbot Hadsell K. Vestibular Function and Motion Sickness Susceptibility: Videonystagmographic Evidence From Oculomotor and Caloric Tests. American Journal of Audiology [Internet]. 2020 Jun [cited 2020 Nov 26];29(2):188–98. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=143637995