Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference?

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  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      Professor, Endowed Academic Chair on Social Work (Health), and Associate Dean for Research, University of Alabama School of Social Work, Tuscaloosa, AL
      Masters Student, Forensic Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, NY
      Assistant Professor, Temple University Klein College of Media and Communication, Philadelphia, PA
      Research Associate, Department of Applied Economics, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN
      Associate Professor, Pusan National University School of Social Welfare, Pusan, South Korea
      Professor, Hill Crest Foundation Endowed Chair in Mental Health, University of Alabama School of Social Work, Tuscaloosa, AL
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Objectives: In the current study, we aimed to compare the levels of and factors associated with mental health attitude between males and females. Of particular interest was ascertaining the degree to which mental health literacy was related to mental health attitude and whether this relationship would vary by gender. Methods: A total of 732 participants aged 18 years or more were recruited from attendees at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair. We used the Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS) to measure attitude toward and literacy of mental health. Results: Our multivariate analysis reported that males' mental health attitude was significantly lower than females. Some factors associated with mental health attitude differed by gender as well. Among men, receiving more social support, experiencing higher levels of depression, and being married predicted greater mental health attitude. Among women, older age was associated with lower mental health attitude levels. However, mental health literacy was the strongest factor regardless of gender. Men and women with greater mental health literacy had a more positive mental health attitude. Conclusions: Provision of tailored mental health literacy education both for males and females could potentially improve the public's mental health attitude toward mental illness.
    • Journal Subset:
      Blind Peer Reviewed; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Health Promotion/Education; Peer Reviewed; USA
    • Instrumentation:
      Mental health literacy scale (MHLS)
    • ISSN:
      1087-3244
    • MEDLINE Info:
      NLM UID: 9602338
    • Publication Date:
      20200410
    • Publication Date:
      20200413
    • DOI:
      10.5993/AJHB.44.3.1
    • Accession Number:
      142625830
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HEE YUN LEE et al. Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference? American Journal of Health Behavior, [s. l.], v. 44, n. 3, p. 282–291, 2020. DOI 10.5993/AJHB.44.3.1. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=142625830. Acesso em: 28 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Hee Yun Lee, Junseon Hwang, Ball JG, Jongwook Lee, Youngmi Yu, Albright DL. Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference? American Journal of Health Behavior. 2020;44(3):282-291. doi:10.5993/AJHB.44.3.1
    • APA:
      Hee Yun Lee, Junseon Hwang, Ball, J. G., Jongwook Lee, Youngmi Yu, & Albright, D. L. (2020). Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference? American Journal of Health Behavior, 44(3), 282–291. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.44.3.1
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Hee Yun Lee, Junseon Hwang, Jennifer G. Ball, Jongwook Lee, Youngmi Yu, and David L. Albright. 2020. “Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference?” American Journal of Health Behavior 44 (3): 282–91. doi:10.5993/AJHB.44.3.1.
    • Harvard:
      Hee Yun Lee et al. (2020) ‘Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference?’, American Journal of Health Behavior, 44(3), pp. 282–291. doi: 10.5993/AJHB.44.3.1.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Hee Yun Lee, Junseon Hwang, Ball, JG, Jongwook Lee, Youngmi Yu & Albright, DL 2020, ‘Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference?’, American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 282–291, viewed 28 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Hee Yun Lee, et al. “Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference?” American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 44, no. 3, May 2020, pp. 282–291. EBSCOhost, doi:10.5993/AJHB.44.3.1.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Hee Yun Lee, Junseon Hwang, Jennifer G. Ball, Jongwook Lee, Youngmi Yu, and David L. Albright. “Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference?” American Journal of Health Behavior 44, no. 3 (May 2020): 282–91. doi:10.5993/AJHB.44.3.1.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Hee Yun Lee, Junseon Hwang, Ball JG, Jongwook Lee, Youngmi Yu, Albright DL. Mental Health Literacy Affects Mental Health Attitude: Is There a Gender Difference? American Journal of Health Behavior [Internet]. 2020 May [cited 2020 Sep 28];44(3):282–91. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=142625830