Power of lower extremities is most important determinant of agility among physically inactive or active adult people.

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  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
      Folkhälsan Research Center, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
      Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland
      Department of Government Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland
      Research Departments, The Social Insurance Institution, Turku, Finland
      Department of Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland
      Arcada University of Applied Sciences, Helsinki, Finland
      Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Abstract: Objective: The purpose of this cross‐sectional study was to determine the relationships between agility, running speed, jumping height and length, body mass index, self‐report pain in back and in lower extremities, personal factors as self‐report health and fitness, and leisure time physical activity in physically inactive or active adult people. Methods: Altogether, 233 healthy subjects, 149 women (43.0 ± 7.3 years) and 84 men (44.0 ± 7.7 years), participated into study. Outcome measures were described in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health domains. Results: Multiple regression analysis showed that jumping length explained 24.6% and 15.3% of the variance associated with agility in women and men (adjusted R2 = .246, p < .001; adjusted R2 = .153, p = .001, respectively). Conclusions: Jumping length was the main determinant of agility among physically inactive or active women and men. The findings of this study strengthen opinion that the Agility Test for Adults demands also other physical and cognitive characteristics as measured now and their part explaining agility results may be relatively great. We suggest that perception and decision making explain for a great part in agility. It seems that body mass index does not play important role in agility, but physical inactivity can explain or increase the decline of agility. Also, various biological mechanisms in aging process can be linked to the deterioration of capacity of agility.
    • Journal Subset:
      Allied Health; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland
    • Instrumentation:
      Nordic Questionnaire
      Agility Test for Adults (ATA) (Manderoos et al.)
    • ISSN:
      1358-2267
    • MEDLINE Info:
      NLM UID: 9612022
    • Grant Information:
      The Folkhälsan Research Center.
    • Publication Date:
      20180710
    • Publication Date:
      20190701
    • DOI:
      http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pri.1716
    • Accession Number:
      130547986
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MANDEROOS, S. et al. Power of lower extremities is most important determinant of agility among physically inactive or active adult people. Physiotherapy Research International, [s. l.], v. 23, n. 3, p. 1, 2018. DOI 10.1002/pri.1716. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=130547986. Acesso em: 7 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Manderoos S, Vaara M, Karppi S, et al. Power of lower extremities is most important determinant of agility among physically inactive or active adult people. Physiotherapy Research International. 2018;23(3):1. doi:10.1002/pri.1716
    • APA:
      Manderoos, S., Vaara, M., Karppi, S., Aunola, S., Puukka, P., Surakka, J., & Mälkiä, E. (2018). Power of lower extremities is most important determinant of agility among physically inactive or active adult people. Physiotherapy Research International, 23(3), 1. https://doi.org/10.1002/pri.1716
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Manderoos, Sirpa, Mariitta Vaara, Sirkka‐Liisa Karppi, Sirkka Aunola, Pauli Puukka, Jukka Surakka, and Esko Mälkiä. 2018. “Power of Lower Extremities Is Most Important Determinant of Agility among Physically Inactive or Active Adult People.” Physiotherapy Research International 23 (3): 1. doi:10.1002/pri.1716.
    • Harvard:
      Manderoos, S. et al. (2018) ‘Power of lower extremities is most important determinant of agility among physically inactive or active adult people’, Physiotherapy Research International, 23(3), p. 1. doi: 10.1002/pri.1716.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Manderoos, S, Vaara, M, Karppi, S, Aunola, S, Puukka, P, Surakka, J & Mälkiä, E 2018, ‘Power of lower extremities is most important determinant of agility among physically inactive or active adult people’, Physiotherapy Research International, vol. 23, no. 3, p. 1, viewed 7 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Manderoos, Sirpa, et al. “Power of Lower Extremities Is Most Important Determinant of Agility among Physically Inactive or Active Adult People.” Physiotherapy Research International, vol. 23, no. 3, July 2018, p. 1. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1002/pri.1716.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Manderoos, Sirpa, Mariitta Vaara, Sirkka‐Liisa Karppi, Sirkka Aunola, Pauli Puukka, Jukka Surakka, and Esko Mälkiä. “Power of Lower Extremities Is Most Important Determinant of Agility among Physically Inactive or Active Adult People.” Physiotherapy Research International 23, no. 3 (July 2018): 1. doi:10.1002/pri.1716.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Manderoos S, Vaara M, Karppi S, Aunola S, Puukka P, Surakka J, et al. Power of lower extremities is most important determinant of agility among physically inactive or active adult people. Physiotherapy Research International [Internet]. 2018 Jul [cited 2020 Aug 7];23(3):1. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=130547986