Risk perception: another look at the 'white male' effect.

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  • Author(s): Palmer, Christina G. S.1
  • Source:
    Health, Risk & Society. Mar2003, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p71-83. 13p.
  • Document Type:
    Article
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      financial risks
      health risks
      risk
      risk perception
      white male effect
      worldviews
    • Abstract:
      White males perceive the risks of health and technology hazards as low compared to white females and people of colour, a phenomenon termed the ‘white male’ effect. White males' low risk perceptions are associated with individualist and hierarchist worldviews as opposed to an egalitarian worldview. However, there is evidence that Asian males also perceive health and technology risks as low. Thus, the ‘white male’ effect may be more complex than originally thought. The current study investigated the ‘white male’ effect in a sample of US whites, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Taiwanese-Americans for health, technology, and financial activities. White males and Taiwanese-American males perceived health and technology risks as low compared to others and endorsed an individualist rather than an egalitarian worldview. Furthermore, African-Americans perceived health and technology risks as high compared to others and were more likely to endorse an egalitarian worldview. There was no evidence for a ‘white male’ or high risk effect for financial activities. Thus, ‘white male’ and high risk effects may be limited to the domain of health and technology risks. Because risk perceptions and worldviews of white males and Asian males are similar, ‘low risk’ effect may be a more suitable term than ‘white male’ effect. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • :
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    • Author Affiliations:
      1UCLA, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1759, USA
    • ISSN:
      1369-8575
    • Accession Number:
      10.1080/1369857031000066014
    • Accession Number:
      9567185
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      PALMER, C. G. S. Risk perception: another look at the “white male” effect. Health, Risk & Society, [s. l.], v. 5, n. 1, p. 71–83, 2003. DOI 10.1080/1369857031000066014. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rkh&AN=9567185. Acesso em: 1 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Palmer CGS. Risk perception: another look at the “white male” effect. Health, Risk & Society. 2003;5(1):71-83. doi:10.1080/1369857031000066014
    • APA:
      Palmer, C. G. S. (2003). Risk perception: another look at the “white male” effect. Health, Risk & Society, 5(1), 71–83. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369857031000066014
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Palmer, Christina G. S. 2003. “Risk Perception: Another Look at the ‘White Male’ Effect.” Health, Risk & Society 5 (1): 71–83. doi:10.1080/1369857031000066014.
    • Harvard:
      Palmer, C. G. S. (2003) ‘Risk perception: another look at the “white male” effect’, Health, Risk & Society, 5(1), pp. 71–83. doi: 10.1080/1369857031000066014.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Palmer, CGS 2003, ‘Risk perception: another look at the “white male” effect’, Health, Risk & Society, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 71–83, viewed 1 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Palmer, Christina G. S. “Risk Perception: Another Look at the ‘White Male’ Effect.” Health, Risk & Society, vol. 5, no. 1, Mar. 2003, pp. 71–83. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/1369857031000066014.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Palmer, Christina G. S. “Risk Perception: Another Look at the ‘White Male’ Effect.” Health, Risk & Society 5, no. 1 (March 2003): 71–83. doi:10.1080/1369857031000066014.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Palmer CGS. Risk perception: another look at the “white male” effect. Health, Risk & Society [Internet]. 2003 Mar [cited 2020 Oct 1];5(1):71–83. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rkh&AN=9567185