'Afraid of walking home from the ‘L’ at night?' The politics of crime and race in racially integrated neighborhoods.

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  • Author(s): Doering, Jan. McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada, Doering, Jan. McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada,
  • Source:
    Social Problems, Vol 64(2), May, 2017. pp. 277-297.
  • Publisher:
    United Kingdom : Oxford University Press
  • Language:
    English
  • Document Type:
    Journal Article
  • Publication Type:
    Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
  • Additional Information
    • Address:
      Doering, Jan, Department of Sociology, McGill University, 855 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, PQ, Canada, H3A 2T7, jan.doering@mcgill.ca
    • Source:
      Soc Probl
    • Physical Description:
      21
    • Other Publishers:
      US : University of California Press
    • ISSN:
      0037-7791 (Print)
      1533-8533 (Electronic)
    • Keywords:
      politics of crime, perceptions of crime, racial integration, electoral campaigning, neighborhoods
    • Abstract:
      Street crime can easily agitate residents and cause distrust and division in integrated neighborhoods. How does this sensitive issue materialize in local politics? This article examines 25 years of electoral campaigning for the position of city council representative ('alderman') in two integrated Chicago neighborhoods. It reports three main findings. First, crime became and—at least in one neighborhood—remains a central issue in local electoral campaigning even as the crime rate continued to drop over the study period. Second, the politics of crime often spilled over into racial politics as candidates charged each other with inciting racial division or discounting legitimate fears. Third, despite nearly identical crime rates in the two neighborhoods, crime as a political issue eventually declined in one neighborhood, while remaining highly salient in the other. This finding suggests that neighborhood politics influence local discourse and produce divergent perceptions of crime. Implications for scholarship on the politics of crime and race, as well as urban neighborhoods, are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
    • Subject Terms:
    • PsycINFO Classification:
      Social Processes & Social Issues (2900)
    • Population:
      Human
    • Location:
      US
    • Grant Sponsorship:
      Sponsor: National Science Foundation
      Grant Number: SES-1303625
      Other Details: Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant
      Recipients: No recipient indicated
    • Methodology:
      Literature Review; Systematic Review
    • Physical Description:
      Electronic
    • Publication Date:
      20171127
    • Copyright:
      Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. All rights reserved.. The Author. 2017
    • Accession Number:
      http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/socpro/spw059
    • Accession Number:
      2017-44776-011
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      DOERING, J. “Afraid of walking home from the ‘L’ at night?” The politics of crime and race in racially integrated neighborhoods. Social Problems, [s. l.], v. 64, n. 2, p. 277–297, 2017. DOI 10.1093/socpro/spw059. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2017-44776-011. Acesso em: 7 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Doering J. “Afraid of walking home from the ‘L’ at night?” The politics of crime and race in racially integrated neighborhoods. Social Problems. 2017;64(2):277-297. doi:10.1093/socpro/spw059.
    • AMA11:
      Doering J. “Afraid of walking home from the ‘L’ at night?” The politics of crime and race in racially integrated neighborhoods. Social Problems. 2017;64(2):277-297. doi:10.1093/socpro/spw059
    • APA:
      Doering, J. (2017). “Afraid of walking home from the ‘L’ at night?” The politics of crime and race in racially integrated neighborhoods. Social Problems, 64(2), 277–297. https://doi.org/10.1093/socpro/spw059
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Doering, Jan. 2017. “‘Afraid of Walking Home from the “L” at Night?’ The Politics of Crime and Race in Racially Integrated Neighborhoods.” Social Problems 64 (2): 277–97. doi:10.1093/socpro/spw059.
    • Harvard:
      Doering, J. (2017) ‘“Afraid of walking home from the ‘L’ at night?” The politics of crime and race in racially integrated neighborhoods’, Social Problems, 64(2), pp. 277–297. doi: 10.1093/socpro/spw059.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Doering, J 2017, ‘“Afraid of walking home from the ‘L’ at night?” The politics of crime and race in racially integrated neighborhoods’, Social Problems, vol. 64, no. 2, pp. 277–297, viewed 7 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Doering, Jan. “‘Afraid of Walking Home from the “L” at Night?’ The Politics of Crime and Race in Racially Integrated Neighborhoods.” Social Problems, vol. 64, no. 2, May 2017, pp. 277–297. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1093/socpro/spw059.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Doering, Jan. “‘Afraid of Walking Home from the “L” at Night?’ The Politics of Crime and Race in Racially Integrated Neighborhoods.” Social Problems 64, no. 2 (May 2017): 277–97. doi:10.1093/socpro/spw059.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Doering J. “Afraid of walking home from the ‘L’ at night?” The politics of crime and race in racially integrated neighborhoods. Social Problems [Internet]. 2017 May [cited 2020 Jul 7];64(2):277–97. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2017-44776-011