Race majority—race minority.

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  • Author(s): Mead, Margaret
  • Source:
    The people in your life: psychiatry and personal relations by ten leading authorities. Hughes, Margaret M., (Ed); pp. 120-157; Oxford, England: Knopf; 1951. viii, 278 pp.
  • Language:
    English
  • Document Type:
    Chapter
  • Publication Type:
    Book
  • Additional Information
    • Physical Description:
      38
    • Keywords:
      RACE, MAJORITY-MINORITY RELATIONS, CHILD, RELATIONS, TRAINING, CULTURES & CULTURAL RELATIONS
    • Abstract:
      In parents' efforts to educate and control their children, a major training device is the use of negative references to disallowed or minority groups; e.g., 'Don't talk bad grammar, you sound like an immigrant.' Through such practices, prejudices form for any group unlike that of the parents. This –ianti–n-feeling becomes intensified in the person who, feeling guilty about his resentment to his own family, compensates through taking it out on others. Improvement in majority-minority relations will result if children are taught to be glad of their sex, age at the moment, racial, religious and national ancestry. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
    • Subject Terms:
      No terms assigned
    • PsycINFO Classification:
      Social Processes & Social Issues (2900)
    • Physical Description:
      Print
    • Publication Date:
      20020405
    • Publication Date:
      20200713
    • Accession Number:
      1953-01158-004
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MEAD, M. Race majority—race minority. In: HUGHES, M. M. (Ed.). The people in your life: psychiatry and personal relations by ten leading authorities. Oxford: Knopf, 1951. p. 120–157. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=1953-01158-004. Acesso em: 25 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Mead M. Race majority—race minority. In: Hughes MM, ed. The People in Your Life: Psychiatry and Personal Relations by Ten Leading Authorities. Knopf; 1951:120-157. Accessed October 25, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=1953-01158-004
    • APA:
      Mead, M. (1951). Race majority—race minority. In M. M. Hughes (Ed.), The people in your life: psychiatry and personal relations by ten leading authorities. (pp. 120–157). Knopf.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Mead, Margaret. 1951. “Race Majority—race Minority.” In The People in Your Life: Psychiatry and Personal Relations by Ten Leading Authorities., edited by Margaret M. Hughes, 120–57. Oxford: Knopf. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=1953-01158-004.
    • Harvard:
      Mead, M. (1951) ‘Race majority—race minority’, in Hughes, M. M. (ed.) The people in your life: psychiatry and personal relations by ten leading authorities. Oxford: Knopf, pp. 120–157. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=1953-01158-004 (Accessed: 25 October 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Mead, M 1951, ‘Race majority—race minority’, in MM Hughes (ed.), The people in your life: psychiatry and personal relations by ten leading authorities., Knopf, Oxford, pp. 120–157, viewed 25 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Mead, Margaret. “Race Majority—race Minority.” The People in Your Life: Psychiatry and Personal Relations by Ten Leading Authorities., edited by Margaret M. Hughes, Knopf, 1951, pp. 120–157. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=1953-01158-004.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Mead, Margaret. “Race Majority—race Minority.” In The People in Your Life: Psychiatry and Personal Relations by Ten Leading Authorities., edited by Margaret M. Hughes, 120–57. Oxford: Knopf, 1951. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=1953-01158-004.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Mead M. Race majority—race minority. In: Hughes MM, editor. The people in your life: psychiatry and personal relations by ten leading authorities [Internet]. Oxford: Knopf; 1951 [cited 2020 Oct 25]. p. 120–57. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=1953-01158-004