Religion’s afterlife: The noninstitutional residuals of religion in Black college students’ lived experiences.

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  • Author(s): McGuire, Keon M., ORCID 0000-0002-0389-237X. Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, US, McGuire, Keon M., ORCID 0000-0002-0389-237X. Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, US,
  • Source:
    Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, Vol 11(3), Sep, 2018. pp. 309-324.
  • Publisher:
    US : Educational Publishing Foundation
  • Language:
    English
  • Document Type:
    Journal Article
  • Publication Type:
    Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
  • Additional Information
    • Address:
      McGuire, Keon M., Division of Educational Leadership and Innovation, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871811, Phoenix, AZ, US, 85287, keon.mcguire@asu.edu
    • Source:
      J Divers High Educ
    • ISSN:
      1938-8926 (Print)
      1938-8934 (Electronic)
    • Keywords:
      religion, spirituality, Race, student identity development
    • Abstract:
      Discourse concerning religion in the American public sphere exists within what Miller (2012) describes as church decline narratives. Highlighting the declining significance of organized religion, these narratives conform neatly with notions of young adults’ relationships to formal authority broadly speaking and religious institutions in particular. However, the declining significance of institutionalized religion manifests itself differently in the lives of Black young adults living in the United States compared with White young adults. For example, according to the 2014 Religious Landscape Survey, younger Black millennials (20–26 years old) were less likely than younger White millennials to identify as religiously unaffiliated (29% vs. 38%; Pew Research Center, 2014). In light of this, how do we understand religion in the lives of college students? What are the implications of the fact that despite increasing religious disaffiliation, 90% of younger Black millennials are either absolutely or fairly certain about their belief in God? In this paper, I propose a theorization of religion’s afterlife—or how religion continues to matter in Black students’ lives despite their lack of affiliation and engagement with institutionalized faith organizations. I offer a critical account of religion as a socially constructed category that exerts influence in the lives of Black undergraduates beyond institutional boundaries and religious-specific spaces. These findings emphasize the necessity for educators to provide greater attention to spirituality and religion as critical components of institutions’ diversity agendas in general and how religion and spirituality play out in the lives of Black undergraduates at PWIs in particular. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
    • Subject Terms:
    • PsycINFO Classification:
      Religion (2920)
      Classroom Dynamics & Student Adjustment & Attitudes (3560)
    • Population:
      Human
      Male
      Female
    • Location:
      US
    • Age Group:
      Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
      Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs)
    • Grant Sponsorship:
      Sponsor: NASPA
      Date: 2013
      Other Details: Channing Briggs Small Research Gran
      Recipients: No recipient indicated
    • Methodology:
      Empirical Study; Qualitative Study
    • Physical Description:
      Electronic
    • Publication Date:
      First Posted: Feb 9, 2017; Accepted: Jan 9, 2017; Revised: Jan 3, 2017; First Submitted: Dec 3, 2015
    • Publication Date:
      20170209
    • Publication Date:
      20200423
    • Copyright:
      National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education. 2017
    • Accession Number:
      http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dhe0000058
    • Accession Number:
      dhe-11-3-309
    • Accession Number:
      2017-06103-001
    • Number of Citations in Source:
      40
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MCGUIRE, K. M. Religion’s afterlife: The noninstitutional residuals of religion in Black college students’ lived experiences. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, [s. l.], v. 11, n. 3, p. 309–324, 2018. DOI 10.1037/dhe0000058. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=pdh&AN=2017-06103-001. Acesso em: 24 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      McGuire KM. Religion’s afterlife: The noninstitutional residuals of religion in Black college students’ lived experiences. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education. 2018;11(3):309-324. doi:10.1037/dhe0000058
    • APA:
      McGuire, K. M. (2018). Religion’s afterlife: The noninstitutional residuals of religion in Black college students’ lived experiences. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 11(3), 309–324. https://doi.org/10.1037/dhe0000058
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      McGuire, Keon M. 2018. “Religion’s Afterlife: The Noninstitutional Residuals of Religion in Black College Students’ Lived Experiences.” Journal of Diversity in Higher Education 11 (3): 309–24. doi:10.1037/dhe0000058.
    • Harvard:
      McGuire, K. M. (2018) ‘Religion’s afterlife: The noninstitutional residuals of religion in Black college students’ lived experiences’, Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 11(3), pp. 309–324. doi: 10.1037/dhe0000058.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      McGuire, KM 2018, ‘Religion’s afterlife: The noninstitutional residuals of religion in Black college students’ lived experiences’, Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 309–324, viewed 24 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      McGuire, Keon M. “Religion’s Afterlife: The Noninstitutional Residuals of Religion in Black College Students’ Lived Experiences.” Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, vol. 11, no. 3, Sept. 2018, pp. 309–324. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1037/dhe0000058.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      McGuire, Keon M. “Religion’s Afterlife: The Noninstitutional Residuals of Religion in Black College Students’ Lived Experiences.” Journal of Diversity in Higher Education 11, no. 3 (September 2018): 309–24. doi:10.1037/dhe0000058.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      McGuire KM. Religion’s afterlife: The noninstitutional residuals of religion in Black college students’ lived experiences. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education [Internet]. 2018 Sep [cited 2020 Oct 24];11(3):309–24. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=pdh&AN=2017-06103-001