Dodging Darwin: Race, evolution, and the hereditarian hypothesis

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      a Marietta College, United States
      b Hillsdale College, United States
      c University of Pennsylvania, United States
    • Keywords:
      Race
      Group differences
      Evolution
      Intelligence
      Biodiversity
    • Abstract:
      Many intellectuals enthusiastically denounce those who argue that genes play some role in cognitive differences between human populations. However, such proposals are perfectly reasonable and are, in fact, consistent with the Darwinian research tradition in which most modern social scientists profess to operate. We argue that population-based cognitive differences are congruent with our best understanding of the world because there are strong reasons to believe that different environments and niches selected for different physical and psychological traits, including general cognitive ability. Like most hereditarians (those who believe it likely that genes contribute to differences in psychological traits among human populations), we do not believe there is decisive evidence about the causes of differences in cognitive ability. But we will argue that a partial genetic hypothesis is most consistent with the Darwinian research tradition.
    • ISSN:
      0191-8869
    • Accession Number:
      10.1016/j.paid.2020.109915
    • Accession Number:
      S0191886920301045
    • Copyright:
      © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WINEGARD, B.; WINEGARD, B.; ANOMALY, J. Dodging Darwin: Race, evolution, and the hereditarian hypothesis. Personality and Individual Differences, [s. l.], v. 160, 2020. DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2020.109915. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0191886920301045. Acesso em: 30 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Winegard B, Winegard B, Anomaly J. Dodging Darwin: Race, evolution, and the hereditarian hypothesis. Personality and Individual Differences. 2020;160. doi:10.1016/j.paid.2020.109915
    • APA:
      Winegard, B., Winegard, B., & Anomaly, J. (2020). Dodging Darwin: Race, evolution, and the hereditarian hypothesis. Personality and Individual Differences, 160. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2020.109915
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Winegard, Bo, Ben Winegard, and Jonathan Anomaly. 2020. “Dodging Darwin: Race, Evolution, and the Hereditarian Hypothesis.” Personality and Individual Differences 160 (July). doi:10.1016/j.paid.2020.109915.
    • Harvard:
      Winegard, Bo, Winegard, Ben and Anomaly, J. (2020) ‘Dodging Darwin: Race, evolution, and the hereditarian hypothesis’, Personality and Individual Differences, 160. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2020.109915.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Winegard, Bo, Winegard, Ben & Anomaly, J 2020, ‘Dodging Darwin: Race, evolution, and the hereditarian hypothesis’, Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 160, viewed 30 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Winegard, Bo, et al. “Dodging Darwin: Race, Evolution, and the Hereditarian Hypothesis.” Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 160, July 2020. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1016/j.paid.2020.109915.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Winegard, Bo, Ben Winegard, and Jonathan Anomaly. “Dodging Darwin: Race, Evolution, and the Hereditarian Hypothesis.” Personality and Individual Differences 160 (July 1, 2020). doi:10.1016/j.paid.2020.109915.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Winegard B, Winegard B, Anomaly J. Dodging Darwin: Race, evolution, and the hereditarian hypothesis. Personality and Individual Differences [Internet]. 2020 Jul 1 [cited 2020 Sep 30];160. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0191886920301045