Why robots should not be delegated with the decision to kill.

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  • Additional Information
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      EPSRC principle of robotics 1
      laws of war
      lethal autonomous weapons
    • Abstract:
      The EPSRC first principle of robotics, “robots should not be designed solely or primarily to kill or harm humans, except in the interests of national security”, is challenged in detail here. Focusing on security and armed conflict, arguments are marshalled against the principle on ethical, legal, technical and security grounds. A new principle is proposed that robots shouldneverbe delegated with the decision to apply violent force to humans. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • :
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    • Author Affiliations:
      1Sheffield Robotics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
      2Foundation for Responsible Robotics, The Hague, Netherlands
    • ISSN:
      0954-0091
    • Accession Number:
      10.1080/09540091.2017.1310183
    • Accession Number:
      122570918
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SHARKEY, N. Why robots should not be delegated with the decision to kill. Connection Science, [s. l.], v. 29, n. 2, p. 177–186, 2017. DOI 10.1080/09540091.2017.1310183. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asr&AN=122570918. Acesso em: 13 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Sharkey N. Why robots should not be delegated with the decision to kill. Connection Science. 2017;29(2):177-186. doi:10.1080/09540091.2017.1310183
    • APA:
      Sharkey, N. (2017). Why robots should not be delegated with the decision to kill. Connection Science, 29(2), 177–186. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540091.2017.1310183
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Sharkey, Noel. 2017. “Why Robots Should Not Be Delegated with the Decision to Kill.” Connection Science 29 (2): 177–86. doi:10.1080/09540091.2017.1310183.
    • Harvard:
      Sharkey, N. (2017) ‘Why robots should not be delegated with the decision to kill’, Connection Science, 29(2), pp. 177–186. doi: 10.1080/09540091.2017.1310183.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Sharkey, N 2017, ‘Why robots should not be delegated with the decision to kill’, Connection Science, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 177–186, viewed 13 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Sharkey, Noel. “Why Robots Should Not Be Delegated with the Decision to Kill.” Connection Science, vol. 29, no. 2, June 2017, pp. 177–186. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/09540091.2017.1310183.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Sharkey, Noel. “Why Robots Should Not Be Delegated with the Decision to Kill.” Connection Science 29, no. 2 (June 2017): 177–86. doi:10.1080/09540091.2017.1310183.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Sharkey N. Why robots should not be delegated with the decision to kill. Connection Science [Internet]. 2017 Jun [cited 2020 Aug 13];29(2):177–86. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asr&AN=122570918